Life is like a camera

Life is like a camera. Focus on what’s important. Capture the good times. Develop from the negatives and if things don’t work out, take another shot.

Potential

“I really believe humans are mostly magic and that we are all just unfinished magic and we’re more likely to be the fullest extent of our magic if other people see us that way first. And I’ve learned that when I see people for their potential and their possibilities, that they seem to live up to that more quickly than when they interact with others…” – Kat Cole: The Power of Possible

Life advice

Sociologist, historian, and activist W. E. B. Du Bois with some life advice in a letter to his daughter:

“The main thing is the YOU beneath the clothes and skin—the ability to do, the will to conquer, the determination to understand and know this great, wonderful, curious world.

Don’t shrink from new experiences and custom. Take the cold bath bravely. Enter into the spirit of your big bedroom. Enjoy what is and not pine for what is not.

Read some good, heavy, serious books just for discipline: Take yourself in hand and master yourself. Make yourself do unpleasant things, so as to gain the upper hand of your soul.”

Source: The Correspondence of W. E. B. Du Bois

Alive

“To be alive is the biggest fear humans have. Death is not the biggest fear we have; our biggest fear is taking the risk to be alive – the risk to be alive and express what we really are.” –  Miguel Ruiz, The Four Agreements

Open mind

Writer Jeanette Winterson on the connection between art and an open mind:

“Most of us spend a lot of time censoring everything that we see and hear. Does it fit with our world picture? And if it doesn’t, how can we shut it out, how can we ignore it, how can we challenge it? We are continually threatened in life, it’s true. But once you are alone with a book, and it’s also true with a picture or with music, all those defenses drop and you can enter into a quite different space where you will learn to think differently about yourself.”

Source: Women at Work Vol II: Interviews from the Paris Review

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑